See Nearby HoB MembersLegalTech NY is next week and it’s time to network.  Over the years, I’ve grown more interested in the easy networking opportunities (since I live in NYC) than the content at this event (I find it a little too e-discovery heavy).  As I was planning my week, I was reminded of a new iPhone app that I recently downloaded.  It’s called Here on Biz.

In a nutshell, the Here on Biz (HoB) app adds location awareness to your LinkedIn account allowing you to connect — and meet up — with people around you.  So, say you’re on a business trip (maybe for a legal trade show in New York) and you want to kill some time by finding other business folks who would like to meet up for some networking.  Here on Biz provides you the way to find others looking to do the same.

How to use Here on Biz. Download the app (link) and sign up by connecting it to your LinkedIn account.  When you launch the app, Here on Biz locates you and shows you fellow Here on Biz users in the area.   Check out the profiles and if you find someone interesting, click the plus sign to add them to your HoB network.  When they accept the invitation, you can start a chat and arrange a meet up.  HoB has been described as Foursquare for business.

As the iTunes page for the app says, “Never miss another business opportunity around you. See other LinkedIn members around you who use Here On Biz and connect/chat with them. Be alerted when other group members or those in your network are nearby while you travel.  No more unproductive evenings alone at the hotel lobby bar while traveling on business. Here On Biz allows you to easily network with professionals around you in real time.”

Another nice feature, that should be applicable to the LegalTech crowd, is the ability to check in at a nearby event.  I haven’t used this feature yet, but When I get to LegalTech, I’ll do so.  I invite you to connect with me on Here on Biz.  And maybe we can connect (for real) at LegalTech.

 

Here’s a little tip that I have been doing for years. Before I travel, I check my LinkedIn connections in the area where I’m going.  It helps remind me who I’m connected with and it gives me an excuse to catch up with an old friend or colleague.

Here’s my step-by- step method for pre-trip connection planning:

1. Go to LinkedIn’s Advanced Search page.  The link is in the upper right-hand corner, next to the search box.

2. Select the location where you’ll be, using a zip code, and a range (e.g., 50 miles) indicating that you’re looking for contacts within a certain distance of the zip code.  Depending on where you’re going, you’ll want to adjust this setting.

3. Decide who you want to connect with.  You can narrow your search by industry, members of LinkedIn Groups, and degrees of contacts.  I usually opt to filter out everyone except for my first degree connections. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4. Review the list and reach out.

Online (social media) connections are great, but there’s nothing like a good old face-to-face meet-up.  The nice thing about tools like LinkedIn is that they’re not only great for keeping in touch online, but they can facilitate an in-person meeting as well.

In case you missed any of the six Knowledge Management Peer Group Track sessions at the annual ILTA conference this year, you can listen to the audio recordings of them now.  And best of all, they are free.  Here is a description of the sessions from a previous blog post, and here is a list of the KM sessions (links launch audio):

KMPG1 – Advances in Document Assembly
KMPG2 – Social Networking in the Legal Industry
KMPG3 – It Takes a Village to Deliver Effective AFAs
KMPG4 – How KM Supports Innovative Service Delivery
KMPG5 - Creating an Optimal KM Value Strategy
KMPG6 – KM Helps Meet the ACC Value Challenge

Here is a link to the page with all the conference sessions.

Here is a continuation of my ILTA Conference coverage.  ILTA information followed by my brief notes.  Please forgive the typos (I’m typing away quickly just to get the thoughts down on “paper.

From ILTA:

Social Networking in the Legal Industry
Description: Law firms, like virtually every other business today, are discovering the benefits of social networking collaboration. Learn about the use of collaborative tools such as wikis, blogs and discussion forums, and networking sites like Facebook and LinkedIn.

Date/Time:     Monday 8/22/2011 at 1:00 p.m.
Location:     Canal C
Speaker(s):

  • David Hobbie – Goodwin Procter LLP
  • Beau Mersereau – Fish & Richardson P.C.
  • Katrina Dittmer – Baker & Daniels

My Notes:

This was a standing room only crowd.  They actually had to bring in more chairs and there were still people sitting on the floor.  This session covers non- Continue reading »

The International Legal Technology Association (a.k.a. ILTA) Conference starts next week (Aug 21-25) at the Gaylord Opryland in Nashville, TN.  The official conference Twitter hash tag is #ILTA11.

As a part of the ILTA Knowledge Management Peer Group Steering Committee, I had the pleasure of serving as this year’s conference liaison.  The Steering Committee members worked hard to develop six great sessions for the conference.  I hope you attend them.  Here are the summaries of the six sessions:

1. Advances in Document Assembly
Description: While document assembly applications have been around for a few years, adoption has been relatively slow and usually for niche legal practice areas. However, new technologies may rejuvenate interest.

Date/Time:     Monday 8/22/2011 at 11:00 a.m.
Location:     Canal C
Speaker(s):

  • Peter Krakaur – Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe LLP
  • Michael Tominna – DLA Piper
  • Ayelette Robinson – Littler Mendelson, P.C.
  • Yvonne Willis – Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman LLP
  • Moderator: David Hobbie – Goodwin Procter LLP

2. Social Networking in the Legal Industry
Description: Law firms, like virtually every other business today, are discovering the benefits of social networking collaboration. Learn about the use of collaborative tools such as wikis, blogs and discussion forums, and networking sites like Facebook and LinkedIn.

Date/Time:     Monday 8/22/2011 at 1:00 p.m.
Location:     Canal C
Speaker(s):

  • David Hobbie – Goodwin Procter LLP
  • Beau Mersereau – Fish & Richardson P.C.
  • Katrina Dittmer – Baker & Daniels

3. It Takes a Village to Deliver Effective AFAs
Description: Learn how KM professionals and key players from finance, IT, professional development, legal project management, records and other areas can collaborate to help law firms implement successful AFAs.

Date/Time:     Wednesday 8/24/2011 at 9:15 a.m.
Location:     Delta Ballroom C
Speaker(s):

  • Tom Baldwin – Reed Smith LLP
  • Toby Brown – Vinson & Elkins, L.L.P.
  • Pamela Woldow – Edge International

4. How KM Supports Innovative Service Delivery
Description: KM isn’t just precedents anymore. Hear how some true innovators in the field have tied sustainable KM processes and tools to specific legal services in ways that show clear increases in value delivered to clients.

Date/Time:     Wednesday 8/24/2011 at 11:30 a.m.
Location:     Delta Ballroom C
Speaker(s):

  • Scott Rechtschaffen – Littler Mendelson, P.C.
  • Brynn Wiswall – Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz
  • Howard Nicols – Squire, Sanders & Dempsey

5. Creating an Optimal KM Value Strategy
Description:  A sound KM strategy is essential to success. Whether you are just starting a KM program or you’ve been at it for years, you’ll take away insight into how your colleagues have formulated or refreshed their KM strategies to optimal levels, and what did and didn’t work.

Date/Time:     Wednesday 8/24/2011 at 1:30 p.m.
Location:     Delta Ballroom C
Speaker(s):

  • Steven Lastres – Debevoise & Plimpton LLP
  • John Gillies – Cassels Brock & Blackwell LLP
  • Sally Gonzalez – HBR Consulting LLC
  • Moderator: Patrick DiDomenico – Gibbons P.C.

6. KM Helps Meet the ACC Value Challenge
Description: The Association for Corporate Counsel (ACC) has challenged law firms to understand their clients’ business better, be more efficient in their work, be more effective in training junior lawyers, and better budget and manage costs. Find out how knowledge management can help achieve these goals.

Date/Time:   Wednesday  8/24/2011 at 3:30 p.m.
Location:     Delta Ballroom C
Speaker(s):

  • Jeffrey Brandt – PinHawk LLC
  • Thom Wisinski – Haynes and Boone, LLP
  • Mary F. Panetta – Crowell & Moring LLP
  • Moderator: David Hobbie – Goodwin Procter LLP

These are all sure to be excellent sessions and I encourage everyone to attend.

 

This looks like an interesting webinar.

Here is the re-post from ILTA:

Join us for this free webinar on Wednesday, July 27, 2011 at

12:00 p.m. Eastern / 11:00 a.m. Central /

10:00 a.m. Mountain / 9:00 a.m. Pacific.

As organizations look to social media to address internal and external business needs, they must walk a fine line between accessibility and governance.

What are the common business needs for using social media? What is the framework for day-to-day governance, collection and preservation of information shared in these platforms?

And how can organizations weave these competing interests together to reap the benefits of the social media revolution?

This session will provide some insightful commentary from experienced panelists who are in the “trenches” with this business solution.

If you’d like to Tweet during this session the hashtag for the Litigation & Practice Support Peer Group is #ILTALPS or#ILTAKM for the Knowledge Management Peer Group.

Speakers:

Ayelette Robinson is the Director of Knowledge Technology and Knowledge Management Counsel at Littler Mendelson P.C., where she is responsible for the design, development and implementation of the firm’s technology-based knowledge management systems. Ayelette works closely with cross-functional teams, leveraging her experience practicing law and her understanding of technology inside and outside the legal industry to assess firmwide knowledge needs and oversee the analysis and maintenance of firmwide practice resources. She can be reached at ayrobinson@littler.com.

Jack Halprin, Esq. is the Vice President of eDiscovery and Compliance with Autonomy. He serves as a subject-matter expert and assists clients with building best practices and defensible processes around electronic discovery and compliance issues. Jack manages the product line strategy for Autonomy’s Legal Hold and Early Case Assessment solutions, and he is a frequent speaker and writer on enterprise legal risk management and e-discovery, legal hold and knowledge management. He can be reached at jack.halprin@autonomy.com.

Peter Ozolin is CEO and Chairman of the Board of Manzama, where he is responsible for leading the company’s strategy and vision. Peter founded Legal Anywhere in 1997, and the company became the leading provider of extranet solutions for the legal profession. Niku Corporation acquired Legal Anywhere in 2000, and he served as Niku’s Vice President and General Manager for the Legal Profession. Peter has also held leadership roles at Paul Hastings Janofsky & Walker, Thomson Reuters and Remote Technologies. He has published articles in numerous periodicals and has presented at nationwide conferences and tradeshows. Peter can be reached at peter@manzama.com.

REGISTER online here

Questions? Please contact Kristy Costello at 512.795.4674 orkristina@iltanet.org

Doh!

The New York Daily News reports that Richmond County Supreme Court Judge Catherine DiDomenico (no relation) terminated a woman’s $850 per month alimony payment after she posted evidence of ability to work on a blog and on Facebook.

Three years ago, Dorothy McGurk won the settlement from her husband when she claimed that a 1997 car accident left her unable to work.  When her ex-husband, Brian McGurk, saw her blog posts in which she wrote about belly dancing every day, he brought the matter back before the court.  McGurk’s lawyer, Thomas Kyle, “said the blog posts convinced [the judge that] the dancer was fit enough to fend for herself.”  Kyle continued, “If she could blog for hours, if she could dance the day away in Manhattan, then how is it she couldn’t hold down a job?”

Dorothy McGurk also helped dig her own grave with a Facebook post. When a Facebook friend asked why she hadn’t posted pictures of her belly dancing on the social network, McGurk reportedly replied, “Gotta be careful what goes on line pookies, …The ex would love to fry me with that.”  Ironic.

Judge DiDomenico terminated the monthly payments from the ex-husband and awarded him $5,000, plus interest for lawyer’s fees.  The judge also ordered the ex-wife to move out of the couples’ house and awarded the ex-husband 60% of it’s value.

This story is a good example of some of the social media lessons that I constantly teach:

  1. Assume that whatever you post online is public and that anyone can find it.  Indeed, the ability for people to find your stuff is the purpose of a blog, or other website.  If you want to keep something private, keep it offline.
  2. Don’t assume that your social networking is private — even if you restrict your posts to a small number of Facebook (or other social network) friends; you never know how what you write may surface.  McGurk certainly didn’t expect her Facebook comment to be read by her ex husband.
  3. If you’re a lawyer, use social media as a tool to help win your case.

LinkedIn recently released a new feature, called Signal, that allows you to easily search all LinkedIn members’ Network Updates.   As LinkedIn says in its introductory video, below, this is a way to cast a professional net on the constant stream of Tweets and Updates, and use LinkedIn as a business intelligence dashboard.

On my brief review, this looks like it has potential to be very useful, and to make LinkedIn a more relevant player in the social networking universe.  The search is fast and surfaces what appears to be good content.  Just enter a search term in the “Search Updates” box above the Network Updates section:

The search results are interesting. Continue reading »

google-buzz-logoGoogle Buzz is barely out of the digital delivery room, so it may be a bit premature to start a meaningful review of the web’s newest baby.  But I’ll do it anyway.  Well, “meaningful” may be a bit of a stretch.  How about “cursory” or “preliminary?”

In case you are an under-rock dweller, here are the basics: Google announced a new web application called Google Buzz, which integrates with Google’s Gmail service.  There is also a Google Buzz mobile device application, which is accessible by pointing your mobile browser to www.buzz.google.com.  Here are some shots of how it looks on the iPhone:

iphone-buzz-2 iphone-buzz-3 iphone-buzz-1

Buzz is being rolled out over time, so if you don’t have it yet, don’t panic.  Be patient.

It’s impossible to resist a comparison to Twitter.  But, Buzz is more than just a Twitter clone.  It’s sort of a Frankenstein’s Monster of  web applications: part Twitter, part instant messenger, part email, part discussion forum, part social media aggregator, part rich media delivery tool, and part location-based social network.  Too much to cover here.

If you really want to understand it, your best bet is to watch this brief video:

You can also read this good article about it from the New York Times.

A few notes on the good and bad of Google Buzz…

The Good:

  • Google Buzz is integrated into it’s popular (176 million users strong) Gmail email service.  This means more of a centralized hub for this new pastiche of communication.  It also means that it won’t be ignored (like Google Wave? and Google Latitude?) because the Buzz link appears right under Gmail’s inbox link.
  • Integration with Twitter.  If you connect your Twitter account (also Picasa, Flickr, and Google Reader) with Buzz, your tweets flow to your Buzz stream. Double your pleasure.
  • Integration with Google Reader.  Increasingly, Reader is becoming the filter from which I find interesting content on the web.  With Buzz, I can use the Reader “share” feature to send items right into my Buzz stream so others can enjoy the good content, as well.  You can follow me on Google Reader here.
  • Mobile access & LBSN features.  Google’s first swing at Buzz for mobile is impressive.  It shows a list view and a decent map view of nearby Tweets Buzzes (see pics above).  This will help Google overcome their failed attempt at LBSN (i.e., location-based social networking (see Google Latitude).  Lookout FourSquare?
  • The @ factor.  Like Twitter, you can direct a Buzz to a user by using the “at” symbol as a prefix to an email address.  So, to send someone  a Buzz, type @email_address@gmail.com in the Buzz box.

The Bad:

  • Direct messaging? As noted, there is an @ function, but it is not readily apparent whether there is a direct (private) message shortcut function (the equivalent of using the “d” in Twitter).  You can send a private message to “a small group of your closest friends,” (see the video) but doing so is just a tad cumbersome.  Shortcut, please.
  • Searching email also searches Buzz items.  Gmail’s ability to quickly search your email items is one of it’s best features.  As of this morning, search results included Buzz results.  Not good.  Google should be able to fix this (and there may already be a filter for it).  But the default search should exclude Buzz results, or Google should simply include a button to select the content to search.
  • Buzz to email.  Some users have already complained of being  inundated with email because Buzzes are going right into their inboxes (rather than into the separate Buzz location).  This is designed to happen when someone comments on your Buzz or sends you an “@ message” – so that you don’t miss it.  There should be an option to disable this feature.
  • Speaking of comments… everything in moderation, please.  This is not Twitter: people can comment on your Buzzes.  Sounds great, unless you follow someone like Robert Scoble or Pete Cashmore (of Mashable), then it’s WAY too much information.  A recent Buzz by Scoble elicited 100 “likes” and 145 comments.  Scrolling down through all those comments to the next Buzz took a while.  And I hate to say it, but a lot of those comments were meaningless blather.  Buzz needs a “show/hide” comments link (default view to hide) to avoid this.
  • Long posts: Again, this is not Twitter.  There is no 140 character limit on what you can Buzz about.  Scoble said he likes this, but I disagree.  Twitter has gotten us used to short messages.  140 characters may be too short, but I don’t want to read War and Peace in someone’s Buzz post.  Maybe there is a limit, but I couldn’t find it.
  • A butterfly?  (See the video) I get it, I get it: social butterfly.  But shouldn’t Google have used a bee or a hornet as the mascot?

As a preemptive strike, I’ll just say that the Google Buzz integration with Gmail had better not mess up my Gmail contacts!!!  There’s already enough frustration with that as it is.

That’s it – quick and dirty.  If you’re using Google Buzz, then let’s connect.  Find my Buzz information on my Google Profile.  I’ve also created a LinkedIn Group called Google Buzz where people can discuss it (in a less buzzy, old-school discussion- forum-type of way), so join that too.

So, what are your thoughts about Google Buzz?  Please comment below.

LawyerKM :: Knowledge Management & Technology for Lawyers and Law Firms

The take away: Location-based social networking is about “assisted serendipity” – using technology to turn an otherwise chance encounter into a real business opportunity.

Location-based social networking (LBSN) applications are becoming quite popular.  They are not entirely new, however.  Here’s a nice list of LBSN sites – some of which have been discontinued, including the Google-owned Dodgeball (replaced by Google Latitude).  The most hyped LBSN app is Foursquare.  If you follow me on Twitter or are a Facebook friend, then you know that I’ve been experimenting with Foursquare for several weeks now.

location-locationWhat is a LBSN?

We’ve barely wrapped our heads around Twitter, and now we’re expected to adopt yet another new-fangled social media phenomenon.  To help explain why you might want to do this, I’ll use Foursquare as an example. Here’s how it works:

Much like any social network, Foursquare members start by creating profiles and adding friends or contacts.  But unlike most SN sites, Foursquare is meant to be used on the go – from a mobile device (I use Foursquare’s iPhone App, but there are apps for BlackBerry and Android too).  Using a mobile device’s GPS or cell tower triangulation technology, Foursquare suggests nearby locations — perhaps a bar or museum or sporting event venue — where a user can “check-in.”

Users can view details about nearby places, including tips left by previous Foursquare users (e.g., “Try the bacon cheeseburger…”).  Users can also see who else has checked-in recently.  Local businesses take advantage of location-based data to help lure customers with special offers.

tasti-dFor example, on a recent trip to The Shops at Columbus Circle in New York, the nearby Tasti D-Lite shop “noticed” I was there and offered a discount on an ice cream cone if I stopped by.

There is also a “game” aspect to Foursquare.  Users collect “badges” and points for various activities like checking in to ten or more locations in a week, or for checking in to different types on places.  My favorite is the “Jobs” badge (awarded for checking in to three or more Apple Stores), which entitles you to a free “iHoverboard” if you show the badge to an Apple Genius at the store.

Foursquare also lists the times and locations where your friends check in.  If you’re really in to it, you can get an alert every time someone checks in to any location (I don’t recommend this because it will drive you crazy – especially if your Foursquare friends are active users).

Finally, you can opt link your Foursquare account with your other social networks so that your Foursquare updates appear on your Facebook wall or in your Twitter stream.  Fair warning: this might irritate your Twitter followers and Facebook friends – especially if you’re an active user – because they will be inundated with messages like “Patrick just checked in at the Apple Store…” all day long.  Rather than setting Foursquare to automatically update your other networks, set it to prompt you to choose whether to do so on a case-by-case basis.

OK….so why would I want do that?

This is the same question that we asked about LinkedIn, then Facebook, then Twitter before millions of people signed up.  There are lots of theories about why we do this social networking stuff.  But do we need yet another social network; one that lets everyone know where we are – all the time?  Well, this may fall under the Steve Jobs category of “a lot of times, people don’t know what they want until you show it to them.”

Do you want to let everyone know where you are all the time?  Probably not.  But that’s not the question.  The question is: Would you like a unique opportunity to connect with your contacts — in real life?

Location-based social networking is not about restaurant recommendations, or discounted ice cream, or badges.  It’s about “assisted serendipity.”  Never before have we been able to help along a chance encounter, or to take advantage of an opportunity that we didn’t even know existed.

For example, let’s say you’re traveling and have some time to kill while you wait for your flight at the airport.  Little did you know, one of your contacts–a business prospect–is there too.  You might happen to run into your contact, but given the conditions (the size of the airport, the number of people, etc.) the chances are slim.  More than a mere catalyst that simply hastens an inevitable chemical reaction, a LBSN, like Foursquare can create an opportunity — turning a potential chance meeting into a sure thing.

So, will you use a LBSN application, or is it just too much too soon?

LawyerKM :: Knowledge Management & Technology for Lawyers and Law Firms

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